A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions, congress, exhibitions, business, social and sporting, public, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, and helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5000 people working in Russia and abroad. In addition, it works in close cooperation with 160 economic partners; industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions; and financial, trade, and business associations from 75 countries worldwide.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian (t.me/Roscongress), English (t.me/RoscongressDirect), and Spanish (t.me/RoscongressEsp). Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

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Anton Kotyakov

Anton Kotyakov

Minister of Labour and Social Protection of the Russian Federation
Quotes
03.09.2021
EEF 2021
Mass Youth Involvement in Entrepreneurship: Current Realities and Future Potential
We are already working together with our colleagues to develop a youth employment programme. In the process of this, we are paying a significant amount of attention to career guidance procedures at the latter stages of schooling, as well as during the first year of university or college. This is so young people gain a clear understanding of what areas and what industries are most attractive to them. <...> In this regard, we are also working with employment centres to raise awareness and offer assistance to potential entrepreneurs from the point of view of current legislation. <...> Incentive regimes [for young people – ed.] are already in place
03.09.2021
EEF 2021
Mass Youth Involvement in Entrepreneurship: Current Realities and Future Potential
In addition to centres of excellence, I would probably also highlight the need for the government to provide assistance in terms of shaping knowledge and skills at an earlier stage. <...> Young people endeavouring to develop their business are not always that focused on the regulatory framework of various regimes
03.09.2021
EEF 2021
Mass Youth Involvement in Entrepreneurship: Current Realities and Future Potential
According to surveys we are seeing today, more than 56% of young people see their prospects and future lying specifically in entrepreneurship. This could be connected to freelance work, or coming up with products and ideas. This proactiveness is reflected in growth rates and figures. According to statistics, young people account for 30% of the entrepreneurial community. At the same time, the average age of an entrepreneur today is 38. <…> If we look at the number of new small enterprises opening and the number of young people becoming self-employed, then the most active group in 2019 were young people aged 24 – 29, and in 2020 it was already the 18–24 cohort. This is the trend we are seeing
02.09.2021
EEF 2021
Challenges and Prospects for the Russian Labour Market
The Ministry of Science and Higher Education and a number of leading Russian universities are building a programme for the development of resource centres throughout Russia. These centres will be partnered with the largest universities in Russia. The first one has now opened on the campus of RANEPA in Moscow… WordSkills programmes allow for the introduction of technology into the educational process and for the skills that applicants acquire throughout the learning process to be assessed and evaluated at the end of the training programme on the basis of a practical exam in real-world conditions
02.09.2021
EEF 2021
Challenges and Prospects for the Russian Labour Market
During the pandemic there was a significant increase in the number of citizens registered at job centres, with the figure peaking at 3.7 million. Today, there are around 1 million people on the books at employment centres, but a breakdown of those currently registered shows us that 58% of these citizens have neither a higher education or secondary vocational education qualification. Long-term educational programmes should be looking to target these citizens
02.09.2021
EEF 2021
Challenges and Prospects for the Russian Labour Market
Russia’s unemployment rate is now back at pre-pandemic levels. As of 1 August, unemployment in the country stood at 4.5%... In the period before the pandemic there were 30,000 people working remotely in Russia. During the pandemic we saw this figure rise to 11% of the working population, corresponding to around 5–6 million people. Today, taking into account the recovery of the labour market and the removal of the majority of restrictions, around 2.8–3 million people continue to work remotely. This suggests that employers and our employees have felt the benefits and attraction of remote work and are still working from home. This is a long-term trend that is impacting and will continue to influence the labour market as a whole
02.09.2021
EEF 2021
Challenges and Prospects for the Russian Labour Market
If we look ahead to the coming decade, we see that levels of education among working-age citizens are increasing. While around 24% of citizens had neither a higher education or secondary vocational education qualification in 2020, the equivalent figure today is 19%
02.09.2021
EEF 2021
Challenges and Prospects for the Russian Labour Market
We are now seeing a growing trend for self-employment, and have reached our target of almost 3 million self-employed people. These are citizens who have chosen to pursue their professional activities on their own terms… According to our forecasts, we will reach 10–11 million self-employed across the various sectors of the economy by 2030
04.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Russia’s Economy: Modernization Strategy Reset
We have begun to modernize employment centres in the territories of the Russian Federation. Never before have there been KPIs for those who work at employment centers. We are standardizing this service throughout the Russian Federation, digitizing it, and forming a unified platform to create an inter-territorial unified labor market, so that we have the opportunity to employ a citizen outside of where he or she lives. If necessary, we can help them move
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Preparedness Strategies: Multiservices and Technologies in the Public and Private Sector
Today, if we compare the level of services in the commercial sector, our citizens request the same level [from the state]
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Preparedness Strategies: Multiservices and Technologies in the Public and Private Sector
We saw that executive authorities have serious problems with infrastructure. It is explained by the fact that often to make a payment decision we need a very close interdepartmental interaction between different information systems and resources of government bodies
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Preparedness Strategies: Multiservices and Technologies in the Public and Private Sector
All this [infrastructure platforms] is possible due to state infrastructure, due to the interaction with the banking sector
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Entrepreneurship and Employment in the Age of Giganomics
There is no such magic button. […] We need to not only provide incentives for the provider and employee, but also for the platforms. [...] In many respects, the competitive environment will force the platforms to move into some kind of co-financing: equally or unequally – it doesn’t matter. But they will be interested in creating additional guarantees for their providers within the competitive environment in order to attract a high-quality provider
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Entrepreneurship and Employment in the Age of Giganomics
Self-employment does not provide pension savings. People don’t build up a pension when they stop working. We clearly understand that today people working within the platform and as self-employed workers don’t have any social guarantees. They don’t have any additional social support if they lose their earnings while on sick leave or in the event of an accident at work. This is a fairly wide range of grounds in this case
03.06.2021
SPIEF 2021
Entrepreneurship and Employment in the Age of Giganomics
We are clearly trying to enshrine attributes of traditional labour relations in the regulatory framework. We see that certain enterprises are withdrawing from traditional legal relations to self-employment in order to minimize costs. It’s clearly quite profitable at this stage. If we don’t create a regulatory tool that would not allow for abusing this right today and switching employees to self-employment at ordinary enterprises, we will reach the figure of 17–20 million, which is totally understandable. [...] If now, in 2021–2022, we don’t create an understandable and transparent regulatory and legal framework that governs relations with the correlation of relevant features to traditional labour relations, then, we believe this growth will be about 10–11 million by 2030