A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5,000 people working in Russia and abroad.

The Foundation works alongside various UN departments and other international organizations, and is building multi-format cooperation with 173 economic partners, including industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions, financial, trade, and business associations from 78 countries worldwide, and 179 Russian public organizations, federal and legislative agencies, and federal subjects.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian t.me/Roscongress, English – t.me/RoscongressDirect, and Spanish t.me/RoscongressEsp. Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

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Healthcare: New Realities and Points of Transformation
17 June 2022
10:00—11:15
KEY CONCLUSIONS
Life Expectancy is Increasing Globally Along with the Promotion of Health

Medicine has changed, but so has the people’s perception of their own health. I can speak to the data we have on the Russian population. Sociological studies have shown [that] people’s attitudes towards their own health have changed in terms of analyzing just how they feel. People have begun to perceive their own health in a more positive light. More than 40% of people have started to view the condition of their health as a challenge to their own plans for work, sport, and recreation. Attempts to self-medicate have decreased significantly, and we can see [that] the level of trust shown in the healthcare system has increased — Mikhail Murashko, Minister of Health of the Russian Federation.

It is clear that life expectancy has been on the rise all across the globe, and in Russia too. It is a national goal of ours. Russia, like other countries, has experienced great success for a number of reasons. These include clean water, antibiotics, improvements to people’s socio-economic conditions, and modern medical achievements. All of these have contributed to an increase in life expectancy. And that’s wonderful — Olga Kobyakova, Director, Federal Research Institute for Health Organization and Informatics of Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation.

Diseases of the circulatory system are one area of focus that could add at least three years to our life expectancy in the near future. We need to focus; we need targeted interventions to identify patients. Everyone in the whole world, including us, is thinking about where to invest. Investment needs to go where the impact on high-risk groups will allow us to achieve quick results in a short period of time — Evgeny Shlyakhto, Director General, Almazov National Medical Research Centre; President, All-Russian Non-Governmental Organization "Russian Society of Cardiology".

India and Russia Have Played a Major Role in the Global Architecture of Healthcare

India and Russia have played a major role in creating a global architecture of healthcare. This has been possible because of the way we have striven for health equity in an effort to provide everyone with access to healthcare services. And it is very important that we focus on the use of technology. I would like to thank Russia for providing us with various kinds of equipment that have been critical in helping patients through the COVID pandemic. We have a strong relationship, and we can strengthen it even further by working together in healthcare — Mansukh Mandaviya, Minister of Health and Family Welfare and Minister of Chemicals and Fertilizers of the Republic of India.

ISSUES
The Effects of the Coronavirus Have Taken a Toll on People’s Health

We have started to feel a certain fragility, and it started with the pandemic. And now we can see that the world has become more wary. Say what you will about COVID, [but] it’s definitely not possible to ignore [its consequences]. More patients are being diagnosed with cardiovascular system problems. Things like arterial hypertension, rhythmic disturbances, and a number of other conditions that are diagnosed during in-depth check-ups — Mikhail Murashko, Minister of Health of the Russian Federation.

The demographic structure of our population is changing. There is such a thing as an ageing population. These processes are taking place right now in all developed countries, including Russia. And the structural changes aren’t a matter of centuries, they’re happening right now, before our very eyes. We are expecting an increase in chronic non-communicable diseases. It’s something we are aware of, and something we are preparing for. We are facing an increase in neurodegenerative diseases, specifically dementia — Olga Kobyakova, Director, Federal Research Institute for Health Organization and Informatics of Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation.

A Shortage of Qualified Medical Personnel

We had a session yesterday, and Kuzbass spoke, and [the speaker] said: ‘Yes, we are short on medical staff in rehabilitation.’ It’s a personnel thing, of course. It’s a question of working with human resources every day and every hour, and starting right in primary school. And especially the managers. Education and training for managers. From long personal experience I can say that if there are no good managers - [and] it’s 60% organizational issues - nothing will help — Tatyana Yakovleva, First Deputy Head, Federal Medical-Biological Agency of the Russian Federation.

The most important issue in our universities is training for staff. As far as bachelor’s degrees are concerned, there is a problem with employment for our graduates. Training and professional development for doctors should take place at federal institutions, and more specifically at universities, scientific medical centres with a federal licence. A regional licence gives us a level and quality of professional development that is quite low, and doctors that don’t get good training for 5-10 years really don’t ever raise that level, — Petr Glybochko, Rector, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation.

SOLUTIONS
Accelerating Digitalization in Healthcare

We’ve now developed a concept and approach for a digital patient profile. We’re on the way to creating information systems, with an electronic medical card at the heart of it. The payment system in the CMI is the next block. And in the Russian Federation, it is the CMI system that pays the bills and actually moulds the healthcare economy and should be built in accordance with certain projections, so the digital patient profile is an important component with a list of preventive measures, therapeutic measures, rehabilitation measures. This is something that has to be set up — Mikhail Murashko, Minister of Health of the Russian Federation.

It is very important to focus on the use of technology so that technology enables us to provide healthcare services that reach everyone. Digital healthcare must be used to deliver quality services. The issue of access to healthcare services in various remote areas is also important. India now has a digital healthcare ecosystem. We have a special mission in charge of this work, special programmes. We want to create electronic health records for more than 1.3 billion people in our country as a part of this programme — Mansukh Mandaviya, Minister of Health and Family Welfare and Minister of Chemicals and Fertilizers of the Republic of India.

Making it Possible for Pharmacology to Develop and Establishing Clinical Centres

The Russian Sanitary Shield is a programme that definitely needs to be extended. The level of interaction spans multiple industries. And we need to respond quickly here as well. And breakthrough areas, of course – we’re expecting revolutionary breakthrough solutions in the pharmaceutical industry with new drugs. Literally, 2023, 2024, 2025 – [and] there will be a huge number of fundamentally new drugs. And, of course, revolutionary solutions in molecular genetic biology, and from there, both healthcare and medicine will fall into line — Dmitry Khubezov, Chairman of the Health Protection Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation.

As far as clinical research centres are concerned, today, if you take universities, the real essence of universities is changing. Today’s universities are educational, and they’re places for research, but they also have a third function: innovation. We’ve signed an agreement with Rosatom, which will invest 2 billion to develop the engineering school at our university. This means new smart lasers and medical engineers. Industrial partners need to understand who they are investing money in. Clinical centres will enable us to build up large databases, and the work is being carried out quite actively, which will enable us to improve quality of care, prognosis, treatment, and diagnosis for our patients. We need to create data centres — Petr Glybochko, Rector, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation.

The material was prepared by the Russian news agency TASS