A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions, congress, exhibitions, business, social and sporting, public, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, and helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5000 people working in Russia and abroad. In addition, it works in close cooperation with 159 economic partners; industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions; and financial, trade, and business associations from 75 countries worldwide.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian (t.me/Roscongress), English (t.me/RoscongressDirect), and Spanish (t.me/RoscongressEsp). Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

RC personal account
Восстановление пароля
Введите адрес электронной почты или телефон, указанные при регистрации. Вам будет отправлена инструкция по восстановлению пароля.
Некорректный формат электронной почты или телефона
The Right to Privacy in the World of Big Data
3 June 2021
17:00—18:15
KEY CONCLUSIONS
The digital space has firmly become part of our lives, but we haven’t adjusted to our existence in it

People aren’t fully aware of the new space in which they find themselves because [there is no] understanding that this is a different space, that the interaction is different there, and the tracks that remain there never disappear, unlike tracks on asphalt [...] The social circle in which you inter-act is here and now. You have ten people and, again, it won’t go very far [...] Everything that [peo-ple] leave on the Internet, of course, they have a right to privacy, but they must also understand that on the Internet people probably need to behave in the same way that they would like to be treated — Tatyana Matveeva, Chief, Presidential Directorate for the Development of Information and Communication Technology and Communication Infrastructure.

The word ‘depersonalization’ and ‘anonymization’ of data is very popular, but is actually quite a big lie [...] Nobody depersonalizes anything, and, as a rule, all companies that collect this data always have a mechanism for ‘un-depersonalization’. Moreover, there are no regulations for verifying it [...] There is no audit now of data streams, where it is actually transmitted, and in what form — Igor Ashmanov, General Director, Kribrum; Managing Partner, Ashmanov and Partners.

Exercising one’s rights in the digital space is difficult

In the digital world, in particular in social media, analogue privacy law is being transformed into digi-tal personal law — Mikhail Fedotov, Director, "UNESCO Chair in Copyright, Related, Cultural and Information Rights" International Scientific and Educational Center.

Of course, now the state is the biggest threat to human rights, privacy, and everything else. The American state is for Americans and for the rest of the world because it manages its ecosystems, and we still have such strong excitement from digitizers that they, of course, jump over any barri-ers and cut any corners, creating these legislative sandboxes, and introducing laws and certain by-laws that directly violate both the Constitution and [Law] 152 [on personal data]. We have to do something here and somehow include society in this dialogue — Igor Ashmanov, General Director, Kribrum; Managing Partner, Ashmanov and Partners.

ISSUES
Ensuring an individual’s sovereignty and rules of conduct online

A social network recognizes a person. It can guarantee reality, freedom of thought, freedom of conscience, freedom of creativity, and so on. But can a personal choice be made between the sov-ereignty of a state and the sovereignty of a social network? It seems to me illusory since a person is always under the sovereignty of a state [...] At the same time, neither the network nor the state can guarantee the right to a name, the right to an image, or the right to personal data — Mikhail Fedotov, Director, "UNESCO Chair in Copyright, Related, Cultural and Information Rights" International Scientific and Educational Center.

How do we actually behave in society? In accordance with ethical rules and the rules of morality, norms, rights, dignity, honour, and everything else. We have all of this offline. I think this problem has arisen online precisely because of anonymity — Tatyana Matveeva, Chief, Presidential Directorate for the Development of Information and Communication Technology and Communication Infrastructure.

Data breaches and its further use for unscrupulous purposes

Data is now being stolen en masse. It is then leaked en masse after being stolen or collected be-cause some of this data is leaked from government agencies, but data leaks and breaches of priva-cy are somewhat of an ethical nuisance [...] The real danger is the manipulation of this data and the infringement of a person’s position, i.e., the detrimental use of this data — Igor Ashmanov, General Director, Kribrum; Managing Partner, Ashmanov and Partners.

It starts to get concerning when in fact I cannot always see what has been collected about me and how my digital twin looks based on the data collected and a digital profile that I don’t have access to. Conclusions are drawn that I might not like. I might get squeezed somewhere or discriminated against on various grounds, and I don’t always know for what. An employer will deny me a job, a bank will deny me a loan, or I won’t be allowed on a plane — Sergei Plugotarenko, Director, Russian Association for Electronic Communications (RAEC).

Deficiencies and imperfections in the legal framework

We talk about digital rights all the time. We already have a definition of digital rights in the Civil Code of the Russian Federation, and what is written in the Civil Code has nothing to do with what we are talking about. As such, an individual’s digital rights are like one thing, but the digital rights that we have enshrined in the Civil Code are completely different — Mikhail Fedotov, Director, "UNESCO Chair in Copyright, Related, Cultural and Information Rights" International Scientific and Educational Center.

For now, there is no law on the inviolability of [...] the digital identity. One actually needs to be adopted — Igor Ashmanov, General Director, Kribrum; Managing Partner, Ashmanov and Partners.

Are there universal norms to regulate all of this? Because, on the one hand, we regulate pleasure and communication, but we have to recognize them as private in this case. Or are they public? […] A film screening? Will we regulate it separately, like offline [...] or is it still commerce? — Igor Pototsky, Chairman of the Committee on Entrepreneurship in the Field of Media Communications, Chamber of Commerce and Industry of the Russian Federation; General Director, STP Sales House.

SOLUTIONS
The public and the state need to cooperate in discussing personal data issues

Society somehow needs to be included in this dialogue, because from what I’m seeing for now, it’s an absolute symphony. Officials say: ‘Well, we reached an agreement with business. You can do it. The main thing is that business develops, so of course we will allow it [...]’ In this regard, we need to somehow finally ask society if it wants to share data, digitize education, and so on — Igor Ashmanov, General Director, Kribrum; Managing Partner, Ashmanov and Partners.

It’s right and unquestioned that citizens should somehow be aware of themselves in this digital space […] and the state, for its part, should try to protect privacy as much as possible — Tatyana Matveeva, Chief, Presidential Directorate for the Development of Information and Communication Technology and Communication Infrastructure.

Improve regulation at both the state and corporate level

The state [...] acts here as a mediator that should probably be obligated to consider this situation [with data leakage] [...] But self-regulation is a good thing in one sense. It cannot be completely discounted. There may still be some ethical codes — Sergei Plugotarenko, Director, Russian Association for Electronic Communications (RAEC).

I don’t think the understanding that transnational companies (and there are no requirements for them) is a very good functional design. I believe there should be [such an understanding] — Tatyana Matveeva, Chief, Presidential Directorate for the Development of Information and Communication Technology and Communication Infrastructure.