A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions, congress, exhibitions, business, social and sporting, public, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, and helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5000 people working in Russia and abroad. In addition, it works in close cooperation with 155 economic partners; industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions; and financial, trade, and business associations from 75 countries worldwide.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian (t.me/Roscongress), English (t.me/RoscongressDirect), and Spanish (t.me/RoscongressEsp). Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

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Leveraging Big Data and Digital Platforms to Generate Synergies in Manufacturing
4 June 2021
17:00—18:15
KEY CONCLUSIONS
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Data is the foundation of the future. Yesterday and today, we talked a lot about the environment, about new sources of energy, and about other factors that will affect our lives. But all of these things will be data-driven. So, any decisions in the future will be taken based on an analysis of statistics using artificial intelligence, whether it is a decision about healthcare, a decision about the path to take to education, or any other area. This means our common objective is probably [...] to create a platform and create a basis for this to be as effective as possible. And our country is right here at the beginning of this path, which the whole world is now starting to traverse — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Seeking out and snatching away [...] designers and creating conditions for them to be interested both in the tax regime and in a format associated with competition at the international level this is the task of regulatory documents and the task of the Russian federal authorities — Kirill Molodtsov, Aide to the Chief of Staff, Presidential Executive Office.

No new solutions will appear until we can create certain opportunities for players in the market to analyse data and create solutions based on them — Andrey Belevtsev, Director of Digital Transformation, Gazprom Neft.

The law that is currently being drawn up is very interesting [...] Data, of course, grows exponentially, but the bulk of this data is video content, which is complex and probably does not need to be analysed. There is also such a concept as intelligent data. That is to say, data, as it were, from which value can be derived. And now it’s growing in a linear function. And in order for it to always grow, you need to make some efforts. Here you have the law on industrial data. This is precisely the effort that needs to be made to get this kind of value from analysis — Vitaliy Milke, Professor, Bauman Moscow Technical University; PhD in Computer science and Machine Learning, Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge.

ISSUES
Closedness of companies

Each company sees itself as a small state. As we have wells in the government [...] when each department lives in its own world. Likewise, many companies are afraid, they don’t want it, and they don’t understand why they need it. But there is a very important thesis and a very important assumption here that I would like to point out and that’s the fact that for almost all of our export-oriented enterprises, the main competitor is not your neighbour — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

A significant problem is the fragmentation of companies in the fuel and energy sector and the fear of building cooperation with partners on the domestic market — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Inaccessibility of industrial data

Data is not accessible. This is also very important. Because even if we have equipped enterprises, this data isn’t always stored and is not always in machine-readable form — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Staffing problems

A serious problem is people and staff. It’s true that our industry has virtually everything it needs to develop, but it’s almost run into a glass ceiling in terms of a lack of staffing [...] Competition for employees is global in nature — Maksim Parshin, Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation.

Problem with accessing data

A problem for the IT business is data and access to data [...] Of course, new products are created on the basis of data and technologies are developing: artificial intelligence, machine learning, and everything connected therewith. In the absence of access to data, the IT business cannot fully develop — Maksim Parshin, Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation.

Need to work on a large number of documents during design work

From my experience, any design organization must prepare and must interact with [the State Expert Evaluation Department], with regulatory bodies as well as various inspectorates and organizations like [the Federal Service for Environmental, Technological and Nuclear Supervision] throughout the entire technological cycle of an enterprise [...] This creates an unbelievably crazy amount of work. For example, for such a project that was trying to be implemented at one time [...], the Shtokman gas condensate field, a total of 1.5 million documents were prepared there and placed in 26 sections and [filled up] roughly two good-sized five-tonne trucks [...] [The State Expert Evaluation Department] was ready to go over comments and suggestions, but the two months that are given to them by law is not a [sufficient] period to formulate all the comments that should have been made over the life cycle of the project – to basically predict everything that will happen in production over 25 years — Kirill Molodtsov, Aide to the Chief of Staff, Presidential Executive Office.

Lack of reference architecture

The biggest thing we are lacking is [...] the correct reference architectures because it makes it easier and faster to create applications. They are being integrated faster and easier. The market’s competitiveness is actually increasing. There are more IT players. The portability of solutions between companies is growing and this is a total win-win overall — Andrey Belevtsev, Director of Digital Transformation, Gazprom Neft.

Problem of trust

Above all, the main problem here, of course, is trust and trust in one another. Even without being direct competitors, it’s always difficult to get past the fact that a neighbour’s cow will be fatter than mine — Konstantin Mikhaylik, Deputy General Director for Digital Transformation, Rosseti.

SOLUTIONS
Develop the industrial data law

A concept has already been developed and the first draft version of the law has been prepared. Next, we will start working on the regulatory framework. One of the main tasks today is to make industrial data available for introduction — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Make industrial data available

One of the main challenges is to make industrial data available for introduction. That means creating a market, creating regulations, and creating a foundation for their introduction [...] In order to facilitate exchange, we need to create open standards and apps for access and integration. This is also a crucial component so that companies can simplify the procedure for this interaction — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Eliminate regulatory barriers

Eliminate regulatory barriers to the introduction of technologies that are already reaching industrial maturity and provide some sort of investment incentive for import substitution — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Create a system that enables companies to interact with each other

This is why we need to create a system so that every company in Russia can become more efficient with the help of its Russian neighbour. Use each other’s data and cross-pollinate. Because [in terms of] a competitor abroad, we must be more efficient than our next competitor on the supply curve — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Regulate big data on a global level

Most countries are already taking quite a few steps towards regulating this sector or making life easier. In some places, it’s self-regulatory organizations. In some places, it’s simply associations of companies that loosely have similar interests and views, like the OSDU, for example, which Gazprom Neft is a part of [...] We see that in the European Union, in the States, and in India, for example, the process of movement in this direction [regulation of industrial data] has already begun. In Russia, we aren’t lagging behind here. Together with our colleagues from [the Ministry of Digital Development, Communications, and Mass Media] and our colleagues from the industry, such as Gazprom Neft, we were one of, let’s say, the drivers at the beginning. Now Rosneft has actively joined, as have Rosatom and Rosseti. All our colleagues are present here. We [...] are writing a law on industrial data, which should help us at least get on an equal footing with our partner countries — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.

Support for IT companies

For IT developers, those who monetize themselves through the development and sale of software and earn more than 90% of the proceeds from these activities will now pay and are paying 3% of income tax instead of 20%. [They aren’t paying] 30% of insurance premiums from the wage fund, but 7.6% of insurance premiums from the wage fund [...] It’s obvious that the IT industry will receive an additional resource that it can reinvest [...] In addition, we have grant support and soft loans that we provide, plus the IT business has good margins — Maksim Parshin, Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation.

Creation of publicly available datasets

We can manage this in terms of the data that is generated by government agencies. We have set ourselves a goal – publicly available datasets consisting of data from government agencies will be created — Maksim Parshin, Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation.

In actuality, for a very large number of [businesses], the idea is not that you have to make all the data available; the idea, as it were, is that you need to form a sufficiently high-quality reference dataset based on which you can create models and you absolutely don’t need to provide all your other data — Andrey Belevtsev, Director of Digital Transformation, Gazprom Neft.

You don’t have to upload all the data; you have to upload standard datasets that are needed for analysis to create new models in artificial intelligence and machine learning. So, if a new model appears that is better than the previous one, and this is proven through scientific articles or through some conferences, it can be immediately applied to all other data and consequently improve the quality of prediction — Vitaliy Milke, Professor, Bauman Moscow Technical University; PhD in Computer science and Machine Learning, Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge.

Create digital twins for design documents

The decision to create digital twins for design documents and for tasks that are somehow connected with any design activity in our country, and our country has roughly [...] more than 30,000 enterprises [...] In this regard, digital is a system solution that will enable us to significantly simplify the procedure for working with documentation and finding the necessary solutions. Moreover, it is basically interactive with the ability to work […] in 3D and with visualization at the final stage, when you put on glasses and understand which element of the technological chain you are in — Kirill Molodtsov, Aide to the Chief of Staff, Presidential Executive Office.

Resolve the issue of trust

Under the auspices of the Ministry of Energy and the Ministry of Digital Development, Communications, and Mass Media, we have now begun creating this open platform and working on such a law. It expands the ‘wells’, so to speak. We are all getting in the same well. Not that it disappears, it just becomes shared [...] I really hope that, maybe even within a year, we will begin to move to competence centres, which will begin to not only exchange in certain areas, but will begin to exchange principles of working with these datasets and will begin to change teams — Konstantin Mikhaylik, Deputy General Director for Digital Transformation, Rosseti.

Create an agreement on cross-border data traffic

Our main objective is to create an agreement on cross-border data circulation [...] What does this involve: digital solutions that are associated with five countries in the [Eurasian Economic Union] are very often discussed each time in terms of what data will be transmitted and how. This is a rather long process – securing approval in five countries. We clearly need some kind of agreement where we will just talk about certain specific things. About data, for example. Categorization [...] – which data of ours is fully available, [...] what data of ours we can have depersonalized, [...] and, accordingly, what data cannot be transmitted in any way — Gegham Vardanyan, The Member of the Board – Minister in charge of Internal Markets, Information Support, Information&Communication Technologies, Eurasian Economic Commission.

Move away from the law to business collaboration

The law is an ultimatum-like method of regulation and it’s the most stringent one. The law, as you know, is needed in order to restrict the rights and freedoms of a business, a citizen, or an individual above all. Everything else can be solved in more gentle ways [...] We need to try to get business to work with each other. Not at the level of laws in the strict form of regulation, but at the level of certain agreements, general standards, and rules, which companies can abide by or not — Maksim Parshin, Deputy Minister of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation.

We looked at the capabilities of self-regulatory associations and organizations, and, of course, as we see it, the law should evolve into this. The law should not impose restrictions even though this is inherently the essence of legislative activity [...] But here is the problem, since business has a lot of questions about security, standards, and so on. We have to create a framework and figuratively lubricate the rails — Pavel Sorokin, Deputy Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation.