A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5,000 people working in Russia and abroad.

The Foundation works alongside various UN departments and other international organizations, and is building multi-format cooperation with 173 economic partners, including industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions, financial, trade, and business associations from 78 countries worldwide, and 188 Russian public organizations, federal and legislative agencies, and federal subjects.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian t.me/Roscongress, English – t.me/RoscongressDirect, and Spanish t.me/RoscongressEsp. Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

RC personal account
Восстановление пароля
Введите адрес электронной почты или телефон, указанные при регистрации. Вам будет отправлена инструкция по восстановлению пароля.
Некорректный формат электронной почты или телефона
National Technology Olympics in Russia: Talents for the National Technological Sovereignty
8 September 2022
12:00—13:15
KEY CONCLUSIONS
National Technology Olympics to be a tool to create Russia’s human resources sovereignty in the talent field

The work of the Olympics is absolutely the right thing, especially considering that the Technology Olympics connects both schoolchildren and students; this is the way to take the initiative. Unlike Olympics in academic areas, <...> this Olympics is comprehensive. It is associated with initiative, creativity, an engineering mindset, with the ability to create some kind of product or service and the ability to ‘sell’ it in the good sense of the word. <...> It also provides an opportunity to perfect the qualities of a person as a future leader, and for that reason, this Olympics is for leaders — Mikhail Gordin, Acting Rector, Bauman Moscow State Technical University.

The Olympics, in addition to those tasks that it officially addresses, tackles a few further issues. First, it makes it truly possible to create social mobility in terms of targeted integration, the shaping of a young student’s consciousness of why the country needs him and how he may develop within the country. Secondly, it seems to me that the Olympics have a very distinct effect on human resources sovereignty in universities in terms of the fact that universities are beginning to reform. This is a very important matter that is currently failing. <...> Thirdly, development of the employers themselves. Not only do new pathways appear, not only are those who request these pathways educated, but everyone else is too — Dmitry Guzhelya, Head of Evaluation and Methodology Department, ANO Russia – Land of Opportunity.

ISSUES
Staff exodus and ‘lack of awareness’ of most universities and employers

From a tactical [point of view], it's still a shorter story: now we need to save those established engineers and developers that we are losing today. We have been losing them steadily after 24 February, these guys began to leave. This is due to a wide range of reasons: almost half requested to leave, while more than half did not plan it. A small section, 20%, had thought about leaving. The others were forced to think about it, because their employers were leaving or proposing other locations: in the CIS, and some took their employees to Europe. And during the current time of rapid change, something needs to be done to compensate for this situation ... We need to use a particular approach that will enable us to leave these specialists here, especially since most of them want to stay. I’m talking about this because it is a problem. <...> As regards strategy: <...> our task is to generate interest, to get people involved in solving interesting problems ... In this sense, the Olympics brings together the agendas of employers and specialists — Denis Kravchenko, Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy.

No more than 15% make a conscious choice, and the rest, unfortunately, go with the flow, while working on their main educational programmes. From the point of view of employers, there are, like it or not, probably no more than 20–25% who make a conscious choice. But if we take small and medium-sized businesses, then well-informed employers who are ready to invest both financially and in terms of time and human resources in the education system and in training new staff make up significantly less than 10–12% — Dmitry Guzhelya, Head of Evaluation and Methodology Department, ANO Russia – Land of Opportunity.

There are 120,000 [people] in the ‘funnel’ of Olympics participants, and far fewer in that of Olympics mentors. And the ideal scenario is when one talent has at least one mentor, and preferably two, so that there is a choice. We can agree that the next step would be to expand the ‘funnel’ of mentors — Ekaterina Morozova, Director, Open University Skolkovo.

SOLUTIONS
Vital to boost expert interest in addressing Russia’s distinctive technological challenges

Together with the leading, primarily the technical universities in our country – Tomsk, St. Petersburg, Bauman – we need to launch an extensive programme of youth design bureaus. <...> Our task is to attract, engage, and demonstrate the possibilities of professional fulfilment and solving interesting problems that should ensure the technological sovereignty of our country. On the other hand, we, as a state and as an employer, must retain these specialists so that, trained and motivated, they do not leave — Denis Kravchenko, Deputy Chairman of the Committee of the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation on Economic Policy.

Creating awareness among specialists, universities, and employers, creating new tools for initial engagement. And here I would come up with a preventive proposal to hold a mini-strategy session for interested parties – to invite universities, major employers, the state, and to think about how to expand the ‘funnel’ at the entrance even more in order to ensure that that conscious embedding in technological entrepreneurship takes place. This is one of the core industries in which you need to invest — Dmitry Guzhelya, Head of Evaluation and Methodology Department, ANO Russia – Land of Opportunity.

Through mentoring, we must not only ‘pump’ hard skills, as we are used to doing, educating [young] super-engineers and super-entrepreneurs. At the end of the day we must also ‘pump’ systemic thinking, critical thinking, some things related to communications, and the ability to work with complexities – this complexity now weighs on us in all aspects of life, and is so serious that a mentor is the right person to become a source of support, not only in terms of professional work, but also in terms of work that is of value. <...> Mentors need to be trained. <...> I really like the idea of youth design bureaus. I believe that these are the places where new types of engineers and new types of engineering culture can be established. <...> And I support the idea of a strategic session — Ekaterina Morozova, Director, Open University Skolkovo.

The next year should be a year of struggle for prospective students on two levels: bachelor’s and master’s, because in general the number of students who have passed specialized mathematics and physics in bachelor's programmes is approximately equal to the number of budgetary places for the corresponding areas of study. That is, we must now fight for the 11th graders. <...> And we need to increase the number of young people who choose mathematics. At the moment, we need to show, as much as possible, to all young people who are able to go into technological fields that there is a future, and that they are going to do a bachelor's degree at a technical university. The second difficult point is the transition from bachelor’s to master’s degree. <...> If we are now planning a strategic session, then next year is the time to fight for prospective students — Dmitry Zemtsov, Vice Rector, National Research University Higher School of Economics.