A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5,000 people working in Russia and abroad.

The Foundation works alongside various UN departments and other international organizations, and is building multi-format cooperation with 173 economic partners, including industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions, financial, trade, and business associations from 78 countries worldwide, and 188 Russian public organizations, federal and legislative agencies, and federal subjects.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian t.me/Roscongress, English – t.me/RoscongressDirect, and Spanish t.me/RoscongressEsp. Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

RC personal account
Восстановление пароля
Введите адрес электронной почты или телефон, указанные при регистрации. Вам будет отправлена инструкция по восстановлению пароля.
Некорректный формат электронной почты или телефона
Eastern Knowledge: Asian Vector of Education
8 September 2022
15:00—16:30
KEY CONCLUSIONS
The labor market was not ready for the growing demand for Asian studies specialists

This qualification has always been in demand. From February 2022, we have seen that the demand for Asian studies specialists has increased significantly in the labour market. The demand for sinologists in the labour market went up by 60%, for example. This rise is actually true for all orientalists. Meanwhile, we see that the labour market was not ready for such a situation. Despite the fact that Oriental studies first started in Russia back in the 18th century, and according to the Ministry of Education and Science, as of June 2022, we have more than 22,000 students in Russia studying Chinese, we still have an acute shortage of Orientalist specialists (including sinologists) in the labour market — Liudmila Veselova, Associate Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

One of the problems in training modern Orientalists is that Asia and the East are developing faster than our training. This is the biggest problem. And this is a paradox, because education should be for the future, given that we train specialists for six years, and sometimes with postgraduate studies it is eight or nine years. This means that today we must provide knowledge that will be relevant in about 10 years when we train Asian studies specialists, in order for the knowledge to remain up to date. Unfortunately, this is not happening now... The pace of development of Oriental studies is noticeably behind the requirements that life makes of us. Russia turned to the East faster than Oriental studies turned to the demands of the market — Alexey Maslov, Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Employers need specialists with a set of skills

Our major industrial partner says: “Your guys are great. If you need to make some sort of agreement in Seoul, you go, just what you need. They will order everything you need at a restaurant, they will know the menu by heart. Thank you, but this is not what I need. We need other kinds of guys.” We ask what kind and our partner replies: “I work in biotechnological sphere, I need my specialists to understand how certain interests, including biotechnological ones work, how the legal regulation of transactions is functioning.” We reply that some specialize in biotechnology, others – in jurisprudence, it is impossible to prepare universal specialists. The partner replies: “But I don’t need a universal specialist, I need specialists trained specifically for me...” I think modern oriental studies should be more versatile — Boris Korobets, Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

We have now set four directions that can be integrated into the educational process. Students can choose one of them in addition to their main subject, forming their own trajectory. Biotechnologies are developing, but a student needs the Chinese direction, he can choose the eastern direction and study a certain set of subjects... Students have a choice, and it forms the direction in which they are moving — Sergey Ivanchenko, Rector, Pacific National University.

We also comprehensively train specialists who are able to work not only with the countries of the East, but also in the conditions of the Arctic and the North, since that is the area of responsibility of our university. As a federal university, we are responsible for comprehensive development — Nyurgun Maksimov, Vice Rector for International Cooperation, M.K. Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University.

ISSUES
Knowledge of a rare language has stopped to be an unconditional advantage, it alone is not enough

Today, we see that knowledge of Oriental languages is no longer a competitive advantage. Countries such as China have been able to educate their own pool of talented personnel over the past 40 years and no longer need specialists with oriental languages only — Liudmila Veselova, Associate Professor, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

Oriental studies developed from the historical-philological discipline. In the 18–19 centuries, it was enough to know an oriental language well (Chinese or Arabic) well, and the history and traditions of the people. That was enough. Unfortunately, at some point, Oriental studies withdrew into the shell of this tradition, and many other things like the economic tradition or Eastern jurisprudence, which has now become very relevant, became side branches. Oriental studies began to lag far behind the requirements that the market makes — Alexey Maslov, Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Oriental studies graduates often leave the country or get jobs in different spheres

According to the polls, which we have been conducting for the past three years, only less than 30% of graduates of Oriental studies work in their specialty. This includes translation work. Translation is a very worthy profession. But training translators doesn’t require four years (for a bachelor’s degree) plus two years (for a master’s degree)... As a result, it turns out that we invest huge amounts of money and huge efforts, because Oriental studies groups are usually small and expensive, and at the same time we get a person as a result in six years, that still needs extra training — Alexey Maslov, Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

Probably everyone experiences this. A lot of people enter the Oriental Faculty… Good guys, winners of various competitions. But when you need to find a graduate, you won't find one. Where are they? I don’t know. They are all working somewhere. You won’t find them in Russia, they are scattered all over the world — Sergey Ivanchenko, Rector, Pacific National University.

SOLUTIONS
It is necessary to change the approach to teaching orientalists and update the programmes

Oriental studies as a scientific specialty is not fixed… It needs to be consolidated, because that activates a number of mechanisms… Secondly, of course, we need to update programmes. I think programmes should fit into a certain ecosystem. This means we should start training children at school, continue at the university and clearly focus the training on future employers — Alexey Maslov, Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

There are a lot of new teaching techniques. Those six-year programmes we had in the past, can now be significantly compressed and accelerated through the new methods used by our students and teachers. This will leave more time for other areas of training — Sergey Ivanchenko, Rector, Pacific National University.

There is a principle of lifelong learning. In this regard, we teach students all their lives, education does not end. This applies to Oriental studies as well. And, perhaps, I would still say that specialization is needed at each stage. It is normal when universities train fundamental orientalists. That's correct, you first need to define Oriental studies. But there is no need to try to do the unattainable and train a person who will become deputy CEO or head of strategy of a large international Russian company straight after the university. This person must complete his path... The transfer of these students, masters, bachelors further along this long path is probably the future of Oriental studies — Oleg Remyga, Head of the "China" direction, Moscow School of Management SKOLKOVO.

Orientalists can be trained in regional hubs and on network programmes

I think at the moment we do not have the opportunity to create powerful oriental schools in all regions of Russia. Because we do not have enough personnel, and we do not need to do this. It is enough to create hubs in the regions that will provide high-quality training of modern Asian studies specialists... Another thing, it seems that it is necessary to create network programmes. Some universities may obviously be donor universities for training. There might be a good exchange here. There are very good programmes in Moscow and St. Petersburg, on the one hand. There are very good programmes developed in the Far East — Alexey Maslov, Director, Institute of Asian and African Studies, Lomonosov Moscow State University.

It is difficult to create many programmes, because each programme means teachers, it means increasing the personnel. We are constantly thinking about how to minimize costs, this is a normal operating activity. And a task like this and its high-quality execution increases the costs of the university. One needs a balance in this. And I think the answer to this question is creating hubs and distribute competencies. If there are strong competencies in one place, it does not mean that you need to give up your own. You are pulling up to what is already very good, and, secondly, you can redistribute internal resources elsewhere — Boris Korobets, Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

What we are now approaching is hubs. We actually used to call them resource centres. There are several resource centres in the Far East. The plan is to open our own resource centre this year... After all, we really should become hubs. If a person comes here, to our university, he has a choice. He can choose, for example, to work in the eastern direction. And we have orders from certain companies — Sergey Ivanchenko, Rector, Pacific National University.

I would like to support the points that my respected colleagues have made: I fully agree with both hubs and network interaction. We would like to emphasize the importance of network partnerships. Of course, classical oriental studies still exist, but we are planning our educational programmes in the context of new challenges — Nyurgun Maksimov, Vice Rector for International Cooperation, M.K. Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University.

Russian orientalists going abroad is essentially not a problem

As for the fact that people are leaving: maybe there is nothing wrong with that. The fact that we are training orientalists who are so in demand that they are taken away from us by the Asian market. Maybe we need to look at who we're preparing. Maybe they are overqualified for our market? They are simply more in demand there. Maybe the go to China because they are not so in demand here? — Mihail Krivopal, Vice-Rector for Additional Education, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

I don’t actually see anything wrong with the fact that our graduates go somewhere to study. The question is whether they want to come back. Come back, put their efforts towards achieving something better for their country. Come back perhaps, after receiving additional competencies that we do not have here. You have to work on yourself first. If we get better, our people will come back even if they left first — Boris Korobets, Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

It is not something bad when people go abroad. This again shows the competition. We really need to analyze why orientalists leave to work in China and other countries in Southeast Asia. We are talking about money, about grants. But here, too, you can analyze the process... Do you really think that Russian experts who left, even to China, do not come back or do not work, for example, in Chinese companies in a department that works in Russia? They also work for our economy. So, I wouldn't say it's a brain drain. This is the use of the Chinese factor, Chinese money, Chinese competencies for the development of our economy, among other things — Oleg Remyga, Head of the "China" direction, Moscow School of Management SKOLKOVO.