A socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events.

The Roscongress Foundation is a socially oriented non-financial development institution and a major organizer of nationwide and international conventions; exhibitions; and business, public, youth, sporting, and cultural events. It was established in pursuance of a decision by the President of the Russian Federation.

The Foundation was established in 2007 with the aim of facilitating the development of Russia’s economic potential, promoting its national interests, and strengthening the country’s image. One of the roles of the Foundation is to comprehensively evaluate, analyse, and cover issues on the Russian and global economic agendas. It also offers administrative services, provides promotional support for business projects and attracting investment, helps foster social entrepreneurship and charitable initiatives.

Each year, the Foundation’s events draw participants from 208 countries and territories, with more than 15,000 media representatives working on-site at Roscongress’ various venues. The Foundation benefits from analytical and professional expertise provided by 5,000 people working in Russia and abroad.

The Foundation works alongside various UN departments and other international organizations, and is building multi-format cooperation with 173 economic partners, including industrialists’ and entrepreneurs’ unions, financial, trade, and business associations from 78 countries worldwide, and 188 Russian public organizations, federal and legislative agencies, and federal subjects.

The Roscongress Foundation has Telegram channels in Russian t.me/Roscongress, English – t.me/RoscongressDirect, and Spanish t.me/RoscongressEsp. Official website and Information and Analytical System of the Roscongress Foundation: roscongress.org.

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Prospects for Global Education in a Post-Pandemic World
6 September 2022
10:00—11:30
KEY CONCLUSIONS
Online learning won’t replace ‘real world’ learning

The pandemic has left its mark – a lot has been said about that, of course – and the digital technology introduced into education is continuing to develop in all kinds of ways. Although naturally, as you know, we – teachers, rectors and students – have been acutely aware that offline education can’t be replaced by online learning and that we haven’t been able to provide the level of quality we wanted to. Although, to be honest, such issues were often discussed before the pandemic — Natalia Bocharova, Deputy Minister of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

The main thing isn’t just to educate. The main thing is that the specialists trained by our universities are sought after — Natalia Bocharova, Deputy Minister of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

A turn to the East

In my view, this intake of students in the post-pandemic period has been unique. For the first time, over a third of our applicants, those joining as first-year students, are from Western Russia and other countries, i.e., the Far East has become a place that attracts people from all over the country… The ‘turn to the East’ that we’re talking about so much, the work with Asian countries is now reflected in the interests that students show when enrolling at the Far Eastern Federal University and other Far Eastern universities — Boris Korobets, Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

Transformation period – a time of opportunity

It’s a time during which a whole host of changes are taking place, along with all these transformations that we’re facing – the pandemic and climate change and the political landscape and education. What does it mean for all those working in education? It means great opportunities, we can steer the transformational processes in a particular direction — Yan Wang, APEC Education Network Coordinator.

ISSUES
Disrupted processes

The pandemic has, of course, disrupted the learning process and this has exacerbated the crisis in education in ASEAN countries and around the world. The fourth industrial revolution and a rapidly changing labour market have only added to the problems of equality and quality of education. These problems remain. The digital divide linked to access to digital education and to infrastructure remains a major challenge in the post-Covid world. We need to recognize these obstacles and develop strategies and action plans that allow us to provide everyone with access to education, to make it inclusive, and to provide opportunities for lifelong education. That’s part of the UN’s sustainable development goals — Ekkaphab Phanthavong, Deputy Secretary General of ASEAN.

A tendency not to come together but to move apart

The fabric of international communication is being destroyed before our very eyes. That’s regrettable, to put it mildly. We’re seeing universities and colleges stop communicating with one another and stop sharing experiences, and we’re seeing an end to reciprocal invitations to students and teachers. We need to put a stop to that, the sooner the better. This is mainly affecting our Western interactions, thankfully our Asia–Pacific interactions are less affected — Kirill Barsky, Acting Head of the Department of Diplomacy, Moscow State Institute of International Relations.

We now have a better understanding of some unavoidable problems, unfortunately we’re talking about racism and the threat to the autonomy of education, we’re talking about disunity. Now, all of a sudden, there’s competition between national structures of education. We’re seeing difficulties with the provision of accurate information or with healthcare measures or, to take a different area, confidence in education — Christopher Tremewan, Secretary General, Association of Pacific Rim Universities.

First results of online learning

We’re witnessing a decline in the level of education of the population. On both a global scale and in our own economies, that’s a very dangerous phenomenon. I’m not saying anything new here, but I simply wanted to draw your attention to the fact that uneducated young people are a breeding ground for manipulation, for the propagation of various destructive ideological trends. That’s why the work we’re doing today is extremely important — Kirill Barsky, Acting Head of the Department of Diplomacy, Moscow State Institute of International Relations.

We may not yet fully understand the difficulty of the situation we faced – these guys [the ‘pandemic graduates’] are entering the world of work now, they’re going to have to prove to their employers that the two years they spent learning online weren’t wasted. We need to stand shoulder to shoulder with our partners from business and industry, and do everything possible to make sure that the work we do next meets all the demands that employers are making on graduates as closely as possible — Boris Korobets, Acting Rector, Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU).

SOLUTIONS
Developing cooperation is vital

Associations such as ours have become an important mechanism bringing together diverse areas and fields, irrespective of geopolitics. During the pandemic, a large number of universities – members of our Association and others – contacted us and talked about the importance of cross-border communication and cooperation, including in the field of science and recruiting specialists from different countries. We have actively developed various initiatives to meet existing demand. We have cultivated ties with international educational organizations and can now talk not only about the development of various measures in education and the prevention of a new pandemic, but about the development of smart cities, the prevention of global climate disasters, the development of forecasts of climate development, education, online education, virtual student exchanges and student competitions — Christopher Tremewan, Secretary General, Association of Pacific Rim Universities.

In this post-pandemic time, cooperation is helping us expand our horizons and identify strategies – not only in education but in other sectors and areas. Naturally, this will have a beneficial effect on all those participating in this cooperation, and we will be able to identify individual and common goals. Cooperation will facilitate not only innovation but will also help us understand ourselves and others in this world, and will enable us all to work together towards peaceful, sustainable and inclusive development. I am confident that the inclusive education promoted by our corporation and network can bring about positive change for everyone in education in the APEC region — Yan Wang, APEC Education Network Coordinator.

Development of universities’ infrastructure as a means of increasing their attractiveness

This entire huge area [the FEFU Campus] that we’re currently working in belongs to students. I think this is an excellent example of the correct, healthy and beautiful – in every sense of that word – environment in which the young generation should study and grow. I believe that afterwards, they will want to use the knowledge they have acquired for the benefit of their country — Natalia Bocharova, Deputy Minister of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

Applications are being considered for the creation of world-class campuses in the Far Eastern Federal District, just as they are in the Russian Federation as a whole. The plan is to build around 15 accommodation facilities, costing over 100 billion roubles — Natalia Bocharova, Deputy Minister of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

Naturally, the new approach is linked to the creation of digital campuses, digital systems for delivering education to the end user … In Myanmar, this approach comprised seven points, including staff training, programme development, the creation of digital campuses and of online educational resources. These are inevitable changes on the one hand, but on the other they have opened up new opportunities for us. Only a holistic approach can allow us to use all the resources available and to meet the needs of students and of the country which needs its educational sector to run smoothly — Myo Thein Kyaw, Minister of Science and Technology of the Republic of Myanmar.